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new year traditions
Answer
12/17/06 9:25 AM
For our New Years Party we like to do the traditions of other countries. If your country has special traditions can you tell me.
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you all from France :occasion9:

Re: new year traditions
Answer
12/28/06 4:14 PM as a reply to balilum.

Hi!

In the Netherlands we celebrate New Year's Eve with special pastries. We call them oliebollen en appelflappen. They are both doughnut-like, the oliebollen usually filled with raisins, but other pieces of fruit can be in them as well. Appelflappen are round slices of apple, covered with batter and fried in oil. Both pastries are covered with lots of powedered sugar.

The evening is usually spent in the company of family and friends, with a nice dinner, playing some games or watch some special show on tv. At midnight we celebrate the New Year with champagne and fireworks outside, after which there might be a party to join somewhere.

New Year's day is usually pretty quiet, depending what time the party ended...

Have fun! Jelga
:occasion5:
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Re: new year traditions
Answer
12/28/06 6:32 PM as a reply to balilum.
We don't have any special pastries or dishes for new year celebration, what is left from Christmas will do. emoticon But we have a nice tradition for the New Years Eve. Of course when it is starting of a new year, you want to predict future so we buy horse shoe shaped pieces of tin. They aren't the size of a real horse shoe though, about 5cm or so.

Those we melt in a certain scoop over a fire and then spill it fast on the cold water. The melted tin will form itself again when hitting the cold water and getting cold again. You take that form and place it between a wall and a light so that you can see what shape the shadow makes. Then you can start guessing what it might predict. :mrgreen:

Re: new year traditions
Answer
12/30/06 5:45 PM as a reply to balilum.
I can't think of any traditions or food as such.

I still live at home with my family and we invite around 20-30 people round each year for a party. We have lots of games and drinks and food. Food leftover form Christmas is fine with a few new things as well. If you like triffle (which I don't but many at the party do) my mum makes a chocolate triffle with chocolate muffins in and chocolate sauce and cream and chocolate swiss roll and other things and for them that want it chocolate ice cream to go with it. But we do tend to have more pudding than savoury food.

We watch the countdown to New Year on the T.V. Good old Big Bens Chimes and then we sing Auld Lang Syne.

New years day is pretty quiet with most people recovering from hangovers and prpering for the 2nd of January when they have to go back to work. I'm the lucky one in that respect as I don't suffer hangovers and only go back to work a week after New Year.

But a good time is had by all. To me New Year is having friends together to bring in the New Year and celebrate together.

Re: new year traditions
Answer
1/1/07 12:10 PM as a reply to balilum.
The town where I grew up have a tradition where people swing balls of fire around their heads while walking up and down the High Street.

http://www.hogmanay.net/events/stonehaven

Re: new year traditions
Answer
2/2/07 10:02 PM as a reply to balilum.
rather late to post, but meh.

Not so mucxh whatwe do in Australia, moreso where i used to go holidaying as a child (at a caravan park at a lake), everyone would put on the oldest clothes they could find, and run around with flour, shaving cream, eggs, water balloons etc. Fun times emoticon

Re: new year traditions
Answer
2/19/07 4:10 PM as a reply to balilum.
The thing Elina mentioned is also in Poland, but on St. Andrew's day (30.11) and using wax, not tin. There is also something about making this wax fall through a hole in a key though )
In Poland St. Andrwes day is a day filled with ways of predicting future.

On New Year's Day Poles usualy sleep long and have headache ;), maybe that's why we don't have any special traditions

Yet another (for me normal, but recenty I got to know it's just regional thing and my fiancee never heard of that and felt very suprised) tradition, this time a wedding one.
In whole Poland married couple at the begining of a wedding has to drink a bit of vodka or champagne and break glasses they were using. This is supposed to bring happiness.
In my region, on wegging day's eve all the people who know about the wedding come to couple's house with thier own glasses and break them on the stairs, thus wishing good luck to future-newly-weds. As a "thank you" act, parents of the couple have to give everybody a bit of vodka D
This is a very happy tradition and not much dinking, but for my finacee it's just another way of getting drunk and he doesn't want people to come to our house on 31st August ( (YES, WE FINALLY GOT ENGAGED!!!)

Re: new year traditions
Answer
2/19/07 5:08 PM as a reply to balilum.
[quote="powsinoga"]YES, WE FINALLY GOT ENGAGED!!!

:occasion7: CONGRATULATIONS!:occasion7:

Does this mean you are going to be wed on September 1st? I hope you will have a wonderful day and all the happiness you can wish for, in your future together! :love8:

Jelga

Re: new year traditions
Answer
2/19/07 11:27 PM as a reply to balilum.
[quote="powsinoga"]YES, WE FINALLY GOT ENGAGED!!!

GRATULACJE!!!!!

Wszystkiego najnajnaj na nowej drodze życia (ciut wcześnie, ale na dobre życzenia zawsze jest czas emoticon)

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