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Confusion On Tutorial Explanations

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Confusion On Tutorial Explanations
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6/8/05 1:42 AM
I saw the latest updates for site news about Steps 7 & 8 in the Tutorial section. My question for the author (or anybody else who can help) is HOW do you know that the black sections you're talking about are the START of a clue & not the END of it? :shock: I get stuck in puzzles because when I see this occur, I have to adjust my possibilities making it either the start or end of the clue - thereby making me stuck unless I just try line by line to see where I might decide which is correct.
Am I making things more difficult for myself or is my thinking the same for others. :?
Thanks for any help given.
WBennett
:color: :happy10: :occasion4: (6-6-74)

Example 7: Complex Color Logic
A single black square on a 20 square grid-line can be a whole world.

Example 8: More Color Logic
Three more examples of "innocent" clues that are significant, but can be easily overlooked.
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Re: Confusion On Tutorial Explanations
Answer
6/8/05 5:16 PM as a reply to Wayne Bennett.
Example 7 showed all the possibilities. It showed what the possible outcomes were if the square was from the first clue, the second clue (both the start and the end of the block) and the third clue (both the start and the end of the block).

Another, more general way to explain example 7 is this:
There CAN be another black square beside the existing one. We don't know if there is going to be a black square yet or if there is a black square if it is before or after so we can't put a "O" beside the black square just yet.
BUT
There CANNOT be another black square within two squares of the existing black square on either side. If there is a black square within two squares that must mean either:
the black squares belong in one block and therefore there is a black3 clue (NO -- look at the row clues and you won't see a black clue over 2)
there is another black block and it is separated from this one by one red square (NO -- there are no red1 clues)
there is another black block beside it separated by a background colour (NO -- in the row clues there are not two black clues side by side)

Same goes for the third square away. If there is a black square three squares that must mean either:
there is a black4 clue (NO -- look at the row clues and you won't see a black clue over 2)
there is another black block and it is separated from this one by two red squares (NO -- there are only red clues over 2)
there is another black block beside it separated by a background (NO -- in the row clues there are not two black clues side by side)

So it doesn't really matter what clue this black square comes from or if it's from the beginning or end of the block...the important point is that there CANNOT be another black square within 2 or 3 squares.

Let me know if that helps. The logic behind it is not straightforward at all. You would not believe what I had to go through to actually solve that Corn puzzle and figure out this logic!!! But I think once you get it you'll be able to solve those difficult coloured ones easily enough.
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Re: Confusion On Tutorial Explanations
Answer
6/11/05 2:45 AM as a reply to Wayne Bennett.
In the last example on tutorial 8, is there not another step possible? The two black blocks must either be from the two or the three clue. In the first case the next 3 blocks must be red, and in the second case there is one more possible black then all background. Therefore we know that there must be two "X"'s on the right which are separated from the blacks by one grey block.
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Re: Confusion On Tutorial Explanations
Answer
6/11/05 1:46 PM as a reply to Wayne Bennett.
EXCELLENT!

Yes, this is true. That type of logic is explained in example 7. This part of example 8 was just to show how to utilize the black 1 clue.
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